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Arts & Culture

NOLA Speak: “Dressed” In New Orleans, Explained

In this episode of GoNOLA TV, Jeremy Davenport, Irvin Mayfield, Bryan Batt, the 610 Stompers and Soul Rebels explain what “dressed” means in New Orleans.

While you’re visiting New Orleans, you’re likely to pick up some lagniappe, meet a yat and have someone ask you if you’d like that po-boy dressed. Not entirely sure what that means? Don’t worry, you’ll catch on quick. Welcome to our unique dialect we like to call “NOLA speak.” Yes, the culture is so rich here that a whole set of terms has derived from it. On this episode of GoNOLA TV, Jeremy Davenport, Irvin Mayfield, Bryan Batt, the 610 Stompers and the Soul Rebels take a minute to explain what the phrase “would you like it dressed?” means. And the answer is a resounding dressed as dressed can get!

Like this NOLA Speak video? Check out our GoNOLA TV YouTube channel for more great videos about New Orleans!

Video Transcript:

Jeremy Davenport: I always get a kick out of when I bring people from out
of town to go get a po-boy and the person making your sandwich will say,
“Would you like it dressed?” My guest will always look at me like, “What
does that mean?”

Irvin Mayfield: When you order something dressed, you’re talking about
food and there’s a lot of ways you can dress it.

Bryan Batt: Here you say you’d like it dressed and that means lettuce,
tomato, pickle, and mayonnaise.

Mr. Jerome: Go get a po-boy.

Slab: When you want your sandwich to look good and taste good, you dress
it.

Lumar: Fully dressed, packed, with everything on it.

Irvin: There’s half dressed, there’s partially dressed. You’re not really
from New Orleans if you don’t get it fully dressed, though.

Derrick: Dressed.

Lumar: It’s everything: lettuce, tomatoes, pickles, onions.

Derrick: Mayo.

Lumar: Whatever condiments you want on it.

Slab: Some hot sauce, add some salt and pepper.

Mr. Jerome: It’s an accessory.

Slab: It’s the accessory.

Mr. Jerome: And you put your accessories on yourself.

Slab: While you’re getting dressed.

Jeremy: So if someone asks you, if you want it dressed, they’re not
referring to your jacket.

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